Welcome!



Search results for 'g.i. joe graphic novels'

1 Item(s)

Grid  List 

Set Ascending Direction
  1. The Complete Terry and The Pirates, Vol. 4

    The Complete Terry and The Pirates, Vol. 4

    $49.99

    Out of stock

    America’s premiere adventure comic strip thunders to its pre-War crescendo in an October, 1941 storyline so powerful, creator Milton Caniff was forced to take to the radio airwaves to explain why he chose to shock the nation with the death of a major character. In the 1942 strips, the World War drives Terry Lee to join the military, where he meets nurse Taffy Tucker and Army flight instructor Flip Corkin, then gets into plenty of trouble investigating a spy ring! And then there’s the women—the strong, beautiful and independent Caniff women. . . .

    IDW Publishing’s Library of American Comics has collected over 700 newspaper strips, including more than 100 Sunday pages restored to their original luster, in this pivotal volume in the Terry and the Pirates saga. With a biographical essay by Bruce Canwell and an introduction by Jerry Robinson. The fourth in a six-volume series edited by Dean Mullaney. Learn More

  2. Rip Kirby, Vol. 4

    Rip Kirby, Vol. 4

    $49.99

    The fourth and final volume of Alex Raymond's modernist classic Rip Kirby contains every daily strip from April 19, 1954 through September 29, 1956. The 46-year-old Raymond's tragic death in the prime of his life caught the syndicate in mid-episode. This book also contains the conclusion to Raymond's ultimate story, drawn by John Prentice, from October 1 through October 20, 1956. Edited and designed by Eisner Award-winner Dean Mullaney, with a biographical and historical essay by Brian Walker. Learn More
  3. The Complete Terry and The Pirates, Vol. 5

    The Complete Terry and The Pirates, Vol. 5

    $49.99

    Out of stock

    IDW Publishing’s Library of American Comics has collected over 700 newspaper strips, including more than 100 Sunday pages restored to their original luster in this pivotal volume in the Terry and the Pirates saga. “If the ‘Greatest Generation’ had a cartoonist-in-chief, Milton Caniff. was it,” says Newsweek. Master storyteller Milton Caniff’s Terry and the Pirates brings 1943-44’s battles in the Pacific to life as Flight Officer Terry Lee earns his wings in a Sunday page so powerful, it was entered into the Congressional Record! In this fifth volume of The Complete Terry and the Pirates, old friends and foes cross paths with such major new characters as Terry’s comrades-in-arms, Snake Tumblin and the inimitable Hotshot Charlie. There are new romantic interests Willow Belinda, Jane Allen, and Jane McGillicudy—and neither Madame Shoo-Shoo nor Captain Midi are exactly who they seem . . .

    The fifth in a six-volume series edited by Dean Mullaney. With a biographical essay by Bruce Canwell and an introduction by Jeet Heer. Learn More

  4. Scorchy Smith and the Art of Noel Sickles

    Scorchy Smith and the Art of Noel Sickles

    $49.99

    Out of stock

    Noel Sickles drew comics for three brief years, yet his groundbreaking work on the 1930s aviation adventure series Scorchy Smith is a milestone in the history of newspaper comic strips. Over the past 70 years, however, readers have seen only occasional excerpts of this seminal work. Now IDW’s Library of American Comics presents Scorchy Smith and The Art of Noel Sickles, a comprehensive, oversized 352-page volume that collects, for the first time, every Sickles Scorchy strip, from December 1933 through November 1936. It also features extensive DVD-style extras examining Sickles’s life and the decades-long influence of his work, while also showcasing the breadth of his career as one of America’s foremost magazine illustrators. Pete Hamill observed, “Sickles was the first comics artist to use the brush boldly, in an impressionistic way” as he pioneered the use of chiaroscuro and Craftint shading in comics. Together with his studio partner, Milton Caniff of Terry and the Pirates fame, Sickles created a method of dramatic comics storytelling and illustration that influenced generations of artists who followed. Longtime Spider-Man artist John Romita noted that during the 1950s, “the whole industry was copying from photostats of the Scorchy Smith dailies by Noel Sickles.” Having blazed a trail through the comics world, Sickles left the medium in favor of a 40-year career as one of America's most successful magazine illustrators. A regular at Life magazine, his work also appeared in Look, Reader’s Digest, National Geographic, and the Saturday Evening Post. Sickles won the National Cartoonist Society’s Advertising and Illustration Award in both 1960 and 1962. He eventually settled in Tucson, Arizona and turned to painting, winning further acclaim for his Western canvases. Learn More

1 Item(s)

Grid  List 

Set Ascending Direction